When optimism and positivity is misconstrued as naivety

umbrellaWednesday night we attended the State Library of Victoria’s 2015 Stephen Murray-Smith Memorial lecture which was presented by feminist historian Dr. Clare Wright. During the lecture Clare reflected upon the 40 years since the publication of Anne Summers’ seminal text Damned Whores and God’s Police.

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Digital Life Story Work with Aboriginal Children in Out-of-Home Care

Cropped man and woman using electronic device free image

I was asked to prepare a video presentation of my research for the Masters of Education students of Australian Catholic University. A transcript of the presentation is included below with links to useful resources for those who are interested.

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ASA Conference: Volunteer Work and Entering the Profession from the Periphery

Screen Shot 2015-09-21 at 6.59.41 PMThe theme of the Australian Society of Archivists‘ 2015 conference was ‘Archives on the Edge’. Speakers spoke on a variety of topics derived from this theme: archives on the edge of extinction, the edge of great innovation, the edge of redefinition.

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Respecting cultural differences vs ‘othering’

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Introspection by Giulia Marangoni

As researchers in the interpretivist paradigm we are expected to grapple and come to some sort of understanding of our participants’ worldview. This strikes me as an impossible task. When asked, my supervisors assured me that it is in fact impossible, but as long as we accept that we have tried our best and engage in reflective practice that our research will be robust. I find it difficult to come to terms with these concepts especially since my research focuses on Aboriginal culture. I feel as though it would be the height of stupidity to pretend to have even a basic understanding of their worldview. Although my professors raised the point that perhaps I am actually doing the Aboriginal community a disservice by assuming that we have vastly different worldviews. How do I navigate the line between ‘othering’ the Indigenous community and respecting the fact that cultural differences exist?

The Second Stolen Generation

Photo taken of a protest march in 2014. Original image on stopstolengenerations.com.au

The facts:

In 2008, then Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd delivered a ground breaking apology to the Stolen Generations. Many thought that this would be a momentous step toward reconciliation and a fresh start for Aboriginal Australians.

Instead, removal rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children have increased by 65 per cent since Kevin Rudd said sorry to the Stolen Generations. This has largely gone unreported by the Australian media.

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About Me

ASAspeaker

Annelie de Villiers

I am a research archivist based in Melbourne, Australia.

My research interests include:

  • Interoperable systems and systemic thinking
  • Personal archives and identity formation
  • Digital humanities
  • Archives and social justice
  • Coding

Learn more about my research activities here.